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Continue Shopping Checkout. Reset Pincode. Exploring the potential of cash transfers to delay early marriage and pregnancy among youth in Malawi and Zambia. Evidence and Gap Map Research Brief 1. Evidence and Gap Map Research Brief 2. Cash Transfers and Child Nutrition in Zambia.

The aim of the meeting is to reflect on the current state of play of this problem, its root causes and new manifestations, as well as the relevance and the impact of interventions to eliminate the sale and sexual exploitation of children. The catalogue features research studies, evaluations, reviews, assessments and other reports providing evidence and knowledge on the situation of children.

The authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this article, which does not necessarily represent the views, decisions, or policies of the institutions with which the authors are affiliated.

New Challenges for UNICEF - Children, Women and Human Rights | Y. Beigbeder | Palgrave Macmillan

Competing interests: We have read and understood BMJ policy on declaration of interests and have no relevant interests to declare. Provenance and peer review: Commissioned; externally peer reviewed. This article is part of a series based on findings from a global review of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The BMJ peer reviewed, edited, and made the decision to publish the article with no involvement from the Medical Research Council. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U.

Journal List BMJ v. Published online Jul Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Correspondence to: A Costello moc. This article has been corrected. See BMJ. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Problem Recommended solution Fragmentation of global child health strategies undermines programming and limits effect WHO-Unicef issue joint statement to reposition IMCI, child health Partners consolidate around one leadership body Country stakeholders advocate for high level representation in coordination mechanisms Inadequate funding and delivery to marginalised populations Global partners develop innovative strategies to target poor populations and support removal of user fees Country leaders mobilise support and resources and use Global Financing Facility investment cases to develop ambitious, costed plans WHO-Unicef develop less resource intensive training Evidence is not systematically generated, captured, and integrated into policy and programming.

Open in a separate window. Potential solutions and barriers to success Universal health coverage is one of the three key components of the new WHO strategy under the director general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. Primacy of country leadership Country leadership and management are critical. Increase coverage of child health interventions and reduce inequities Up to half of improvements in child survival are a result of actions beyond the health sector, and enabling children to thrive is impossible without action on health determinants led by other sectors.

Ensure versatile implementation tools for easy adaptation to all country contexts Global agencies must be thoughtful and restrained in supporting national leaders and ministries of health. Adopt a systematic process to generate and capture evidence for policy and programming To provide a regular, rigorous, realistic review of the evidence for new interventions and programmes at scale, we shall launch a global expert advisory group in to convene annually at WHO to advise on child health policies and strategies. Provide integrated technical and financial support to country programmes and reduce fragmentation A lack of unified global leadership has resulted in fragmented strategies, large scale inefficiencies, and missed opportunities for synergy, reducing the effect on child health outcomes.

Collaborate on indicators and frameworks to ensure accountability Accountability is about how countries can monitor, review, and act on what is happening in child health, whether the outcome is preventable newborn deaths, child obesity, or adolescent road traffic injuries. IMCI: what now? Coverage Equity measures are incorporated into routine reporting Integrated guidance on participatory planning in districts is widely used in high burden countries and is raising coverage in marginalised populations. Quality The Network for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health is expanded and evaluated Country level workshops support leaders to design country specific child health packages and use redesign guidelines Formal and regular learning and review systems are established to integrate latest scientific evidence into child health guidelines.

Integrated technical support WHO-Unicef workplans in high burden countries are integrated and synergistic These plans coordinate with the overall WHO biennium and Unicef plans. Key messages.

United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

Acknowledgments We thank the many contributors to the research underpinning the strategic review. References 1.

Towards a grand convergence for child survival and health: a strategic review of options for the future building on lessons learnt from IMNCI. Mapping global leadership in child health. USAID, Levels and trends in child mortality. Factors contributing to maternal and child mortality reductions in low- and middle-income countries between and PLoS One ; 11 :e Bull World Health Organ ; 92 B. Working with individuals, families and communities to improve maternal and newborn health: a toolkit for implementation. Leading the realization of human rights to health and through health: Report of the high-level working group on the health and human rights of women, children and adolescents.

WHO, Strengthening the capabilities of families and communities to improve child health in low and middle income countries. BMJ ; :k Child health guidelines in the era of sustainable development goals.

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Fund for Peace. Fragile states index. Health Policy Plan ; 20 Suppl 1 :i Lancet Newborn Interventions Review Group. Lancet Every Newborn Study Group Can available interventions end preventable deaths in mothers, newborn babies, and stillbirths, and at what cost?

Lancet ; Support Center Support Center. External link.

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Please review our privacy policy. Fragmentation of global child health strategies undermines programming and limits effect. Partners consolidate around one leadership body. Country stakeholders advocate for high level representation in coordination mechanisms. Inadequate funding and delivery to marginalised populations. Global partners develop innovative strategies to target poor populations and support removal of user fees.

Country leaders mobilise support and resources and use Global Financing Facility investment cases to develop ambitious, costed plans. WHO-Unicef develop less resource intensive training. Evidence is not systematically generated, captured, and integrated into policy and programming.

UNICEF: Fighting for human rights for women and children

WHO-Unicef establish a global expert advisory group to gain consensus on state of the art recommendations. Partners create an online resource hub and forum.